Graduate Degree Field Requirements

Field Requirements 

Updated 8/2021.

 

Behavioral & Experimental field

  • Students must take 278 (fall) and 279 (winter), which cover topics in behavioral and experimental economics, as well as 280 (spring), which focuses on the development of students' projects.
  • Each student will be required to submit a paper in 278 detailing an idea for a research paper, as well as a second paper in 279, which either continues the development of that idea or details a new one. In 280, students will continue working on these projects, begin implementation, and make presentations describing their progress. At the end of spring quarter, they will submit a draft of their research paper. There is no expectation that the research project will be complete, but substantial progress is expected.
  • Over the course of the year, students will be assigned a collection of working papers and recently published papers, which they will be required to read and discuss critically with one of the faculty either individually or in small groups outside of class. The purpose of this requirement is to familiarize students with some directions of recent research and get them to think critically about next steps and/or alternative approaches.
  • Assessments will be based entirely on the above. Course exams are not administered.

Development field

  • Obtain at least a B in at least two of the courses in the field (214-215-216 series)
  • Develop and present a series of research ideas throughout each course.
  • Regularly attend the Development Economics workshop and the Development student workshop (“Dev tea”).

Econometric Methods for Causal Inference field

  • Students must take 292 and 293.

Econometrics field

  • A student may satisfy the requirements for the econometrics field by completing the requirements of one of two subfields:
  • Subfield 1: Theoretical Econometrics: To receive credit in the theoretical econometrics subfield, students must complete two courses out of the set Econ 273 and 274.
  • Subfield 2: Applied Econometrics: To receive credit in the applied econometrics subfield, students must complete Econ 273 and either 275, 276 or 292 (also known as GSB MGTECON640). Students must also complete a course or set of courses that is empirically oriented. The last requirements must be approved by the Director of Graduate Study in consultation with the instructor of 275, 276 or 292.  
  • All courses must be passed with a grade of B or better.

Environmental, Resource and Energy Economics field

  • Students must take 250 and 251 with grades of B or better.  

Finance field

  • Two courses from:  Econ 236, 237, GSB courses F622, F624, F625 with grades B or better.
  • The requirement for the finance field is a 20 minute presentation of a project idea.
  • The idea should be far enough so that the question is novel, the student knows the related literature and can describe the contribution of the project to this literature, there is a plan on how to execute the idea and the initial steps towards execution have been taken.
  • The goal of the requirement is to come up with a good research idea that could lead to a second year paper. Students who want to take finance as a field should contact Monika Piazzesi or Martin Schneider at the beginning of spring quarter in order to schedule a presentation in mid/end spring.

History field

  • Get a grade of B+ or higher in at least two of the graduate economic history courses (225-229).
  • Develop and present a research proposal in each course.
  • Present a research proposal at the end of the 2nd year. The proposal could rely on course proposal but should show substantial progress, including knowledge of the literature regarding the economic history of the period of study.
  • Regularly attend (at least 4 quarters) the economic history workshop.

Industrial Organization field

  • Students must take Econ 257 (in fall qtr) and Econ 258 (winter qtr).  Both courses must be passed with a grade of B or better. This is sufficient for the IO field.  A student can substitute 258 with 251. Two notes: (a) 251 can substitute for 258, but not for 257. (b) Students who already use 251 (together with 250) for the environmental field cannot use 251 "twice" -- they would have to take 258 (in addition to 257) to get credit for IO field.
  • Students who plan to primarily focus on IO are strongly encouraged (and expected) to also take Econ 260 (in the spring), which is focused on guiding students toward a second year paper in IO, and has a term paper as part of its requirements.  

International Trade and Finance field

  • Students must take two courses from 266, 268 and 269 with a grade of B or better, but are encouraged to take all three courses. Those interested in an International Trade concentration should take, at a minimum, 266 and one of 268 and 269; those interested in an International Finance concentration should take, at a minimum, 268 and 269. With instructor approval, students can substitute another macroeconomics class for 268 or 269. 
  • Students are expected to develop and present a research proposal in each course. The goal is to come up with a good research idea that could lead to a second year paper.

Labor field

  • Students must take two courses from: 246, 247 and 248 with a grade of B or better. Each of the classes require a term paper, which we find helps students develop research for the third year seminar and the job-market. The term paper can either be the same for all three classes, building up to a major paper throughout the sequence, or can be two or three different, more preliminary papers. Classes combine faculty lectures summarizing important topics, research exercises using data, and student presentations of key recent papers in literature. 
  • Course assessment will be 50% based on class performance (attendance, class questions and discussing, research exercises and presentations), and 50% on the term paper.

Macroeconomics field

  • Two courses from Econ 233 through 237 with grades of B or better, without double-counting courses (236 or 237) used toward the finance field.  Development and presentation of a research proposal in each course, which may be the same proposal, with substantial progress in each quarter.

Market Design field

  • Take two or more courses: 284, 285, 287
  • Students in this field will be evaluated holistically by the committee of market design faculty based on two things: performance in the market design field courses and a short presentation of original research to some of the faculty -- in the form of a theorem, model, examples, or experiment -- that can serve as the foundation of a market design research paper. In the presentation, which will take place before the end of the spring quarter, the student may be asked questions about literature related to the research.   

Microeconomic Theory field

  • Take two or more courses: 282, 286, 291.
  • Students in the theory field will be evaluated wholistically by the committee of micro-theory faculty based on two things: performance in the micro-theory field courses and a short presentation of original research to some of the faculty -- in the form of a theorem, model or examples -- that could serve as the foundation of a micro-theory research paper. In the presentation, which will take place before the end of the spring quarter, the student may be asked questions about literature related to the research.   

Political Economics field

  • Students must pass Econ 220 and 221 with grades of B or better.  Develop and present a research proposal in each course.  Students may petition to substitute Econ 221 or another comparable course from the Political Science department.

Public Economics field

  • Students must take two courses from: 241, 242 and 243 with a grade of B or better. Each of the classes require a term paper although the same term paper can be used in each class so long as it continues to develop (to create a polished paper by the end of the year). 
  • Course assessment will be based on a combination of class performance (attendance, class questions and discussing, and presentations), a term exam (covering the topics discussed in class), and the term paper.